Product Review: Rapid Roller

 


Let’s not kid ourselves – no professional painter is going to buy a rapid roller.  This review is for someone like me – you’ve got a small job to do, perhaps a few bedrooms that don’t justify the purchase of a paint sprayer.

I was drawn to this tool for a few reasons.
1.  The paint is stored in the handle of the roller, so you aren’t constantly going back to the paint tray to fill up your roller.
2.  There is an attachment that goes over the paint lid allowing you to simply suck the paint into the handle, reducing the mess left from pouring paint into the tray.
3.  It claimed to reduce the paint time by 50%.

I will admit, it is a cool idea!  I was skeptical how well it would work.  For the most part – for being a $30 tool, it does its job well.

Step one:  Assembling the pieces
Not difficult at all.  Hardly needed to look at the manual.

Step two:  Sucking up paint
I did have a little difficulty my first try.  The lid that goes on the paint can has to be really secure.  And you have to hold the paint roller at a 45 degree angle to the paint can.  It takes some decent force to get the suction going.  It wasn’t terrible, but it took more effort than I had imagined it would.

Step three:  Painting
Pretty simple.  You squeeze the trigger to push the plunger up inside the tube holding the paint.  The first time you fill your roller head with paint, expect to use most of the paint in the handle just to get enough paint on the roller.

The roller is perforated and has small holes throughout.  This allows  paint to flow evenly across the roller surface.  For the most part, it did its job very well in this regard.  I didn’t have one side or area more full of paint than another.

The con in this section would be – it is heavy.  Heavier than a regular paint roller.   By the end of painting a 10×20 room, my arms were sore.  Sore from the effort of sucking the paint into the handle, as well as holding a heavier roller.

Step four:  Refilling paint
Easy peasy.  This is my favorite thing about this tool.  It is so simple to reattach it back to the paint can and slurp up your next round of paint – seriously no mess involved.

Step five:  Clean-up
This is the deal killer for me.  The entire contraption costs $30.  A new roller head costs $7.  A considerable amount of paint gets left in the head of the tool, even after you’ve plunged any extra paint back into the can.   Is it worth cleaning it out for another paint job???

In order to get this cleaned well enough for another use later, you’ll need a large space.  As in, a bathtub or a large sink in your garage that you don’t mind getting dirty.  You can use the same technique used for painting for cleaning.  Suck up water, and spit it out the perforations.  But, it won’t do the job completely.  I found I had to take each piece apart separately and scrub with soap and water.  I would estimate it easily took me 30-40 minutes, just for clean up.

Overall Pros:

  • Assembly is simple.
  • The mess is minimal during painting.
  • The paint flows evenly out of the roller.
  • It’s inexpensive. ($30)
  • It does reduce actual painting time .
    (while painting, but not for cleanup!)

Overall Cons:

  • It takes some muscle to use.
  • Clean-up takes a long time and is detailed.
  • Roller heads are too expensive to dispose each use.
  • If in a tight space, it is awkward.  It has a swivel head, for this purpose, but I found the long handle made it difficult to paint in a tighter spot such as the hallway.

 

Would I buy another one?  No.
Did my husband use it?  No.
Did he make fun of me using it?  Yes.

But it worked, and did it’s job for $30.  In that I don’t have another large area to paint, I guess it would be worth it as a $30 disposable painting tool…